Keep, Change, Start, Stop 2014

Following Math=Love’s idea, I decided to have my students fill out a “Keep/Change/Start/Stop” sheet where for each heading, students gave me 2-3 suggestions.

It sucked. It made me sad. You’ll see why (scroll down for data).  I was tempted to edit or write disclaimers, but instead, I recorded all their suggestions.

 In general, students were broadly in favor of the social studies notebooks and the social studies powerpoints.  I didn’t think they were that great, but I guess it’s because during power points, kids didn’t have to take too much notes, and the social studies notebooks were pretty simple to do (I cut down SS homework a LOT this year because I did acknowledge that we gave way too much homework last year).  They also mainly liked the kim kash system, and some acknowledged that I tried in class.  They also liked the science labs.

There are quite a few things kids want me to stop doing that are against school regulations: namely, lessen homework load, lessen the amount of tests, change the detention and field trip policy, change after school tutoring (which I can’t because my school forced me to keep a minimum of 10 students enrolled in 9 hours of after school “tutoring” which was SO horrible that I stayed after school for the majority of the days of the week so that kids would have an actual quiet place to do work) and get rid of the red and yellow folders (a homework method that our whole organization implements).  That’s out of my hands, and some of the suggestions that kids gave made a lot of sense.  Sadly, it’s not up to me.

There are quite a few things kids suggested that I change that made me irritated.  I can recognize handwriting at this point and some of the suggestions to start/stop just seemed to fortify the fact that I hadn’t really effected any sort of change in them.  They urged that I stop projects, let them sit anywhere they wanted, stop the lit circles, or even stop “trying new things.”  Honestly, I know I pushed them this year, because kids were chill with taking notes, reciting, reviewing, memorizing, and moving on.  This year, I tried to push them to higher heights in Bloom’s taxonomy and I made sure we were always pushing our thinking higher.  Some kids, I definitely had to pull, but hello, I am not going to stop my intensity just because they’re lazy.

There was definitely a very valid pattern and problem in my discipline style in that kids felt unfairly punished and felt that I yelled a lot.  I will definitely own up to that.  Yet, I would also like to say that my school affords me very little alternatives. It’s really hard to teach all 4 subjects, be with kids 24/7, and have no back up support.  I try to keep kids in my class because sending them to the office is a sure ticket to cleaning duties.  Anyway, I’m just saying that classroom management is closely influenced by school culture.  And it sucked.  It just feels like, how do I run a class calmly if every other teacher also yells (or curses), and so nobody listens to me until I yell?

Also, yeah it sucks to punish the whole class, but what do you expect me to do?  when it’s more than a few kids doing it, how am I supposed to figure out who did it/ who didn’t?

Students were divided about the money system, and to be honest, I hated the classroom microeconomy too, and I’ll try a different thing next year.  I was also surprised that kids wanted me to start exit tickets… I do exit tickets.  What did they mean? I didn’t do it so much in ELA or science, did they mean that?

I think in general, I felt a bit surprised by the lack of acknowledgement or even gratitude.  We got a pet this year: instead of a thanks, they wanted more pets.  I allowed them to not be in rows and columns but groups (I was the only teacher who did this): now they wanted to pick where they sat.  I decreased the number of tests: they wanted even fewer tests.  I introduced lit circles so that low readers could finally focus on comprehension rather than just decoding or being lost: those kids wanted to stop the lit circles.  I helped one girl get an IEP: she wants me to slow down on everything rather than modify.

I don’t think it’s entirely their fault — our school harbors an “all is earned” policy that honestly cultivates a slightly arrogant mentality.  During our field trips, kids usually just complained or offered an improvement suggestion.  The most I got was, “It was fun.”

Obviously, I’m not doing this for gratitude, but it begins to wear on you when there are no verbal or written acknowledgements on Teacher’s Appreciation Day, Christmas, or the end of the school year.  I try to model it by writing thank you notes and having students write thank yous to other people, but I never asked it for myself.

I agree with the students: we should focus on more projects, more engaging tasks, and less punitive measures.  Did I try to change it within my own classroom? Oh you bet I did.  And I sort of want to tell them, “hey, I know our year was tough, but I planned so many things for you, went out of my way to make sure we do academically meaningful projects, and that you guys aren’t just multiple-choice testing bots.  Look at X’s class.  Sure they got less homework, and yeah, X doesn’t yell as much.  Instead, at the end of the year,  he took only the good kids on one field trip to see a movie at the mall and go bowling.  THAT IS NOT A LEARNING EXPERIENCE. “

I also know that I was pretty stickler with school rules, but that’s just how I am!  I follow rules!

And that’s something I hate about this place.  No matter how hard you try, if the school culture is set in a certain direction, kids are so resistant to what you’re doing  (Example: PAT stands for Preferred Activity Time, which implies there some sort of academic activity.  Since all the teachers let their kids out for free time in the yard, every time I try to give them a choice of an activity, they protest and lose the buy-in).  They gang up against you, gossip about you, and don’t understand why you’re frustrated at their persistent desire for complacency.  I don’t think they intend to be malicious – I think it’s just common.  Since we don’t have avenues for real talk, modifications, etc, (well technically we do, but let’s be real – I only have 24 hours in a day – how do I modify 4 separate subjects for different kids when I barely have content material learned), at the end, there is no meaning behind the learning we do.  All we say is, “You guys are working hard! You’re getting smart! You’re gonna succeed!”  And so my kids move on.

I wonder if at a new place I’d be able to not yell.  I wonder if at a new place, kids would understands that projects are not out of the ordinary.  I wonder if at a new place, I could take all the students on a field trip because I wouldn’t be short-staffed nor told to take people off my field trip list.  I wonder if at a new place, kids wouldn’t mind tests because they would actually be prepared (as opposed to rushing through a lesson to finish the whole textbook) and tests wouldn’t be so back-to-back.  I wonder if at a new place, I’d be able to tweak my homework into something reasonable.  I wonder if at a new place, kids wouldn’t say stupid things like “stop assigning reading out of class.”  I wonder if at a new place, students would take responsibility for the things they want me to change/stop.

They have so much potential, but such little intrinsic drive.

So what if they know a lot? I feel pretty useless – because after these past two years, nobody wants to take the road less taken.

KEEP:

  • projector for notes, movies, etc
  • lab experiments in class.
  • kindness
  • the helping for field trips
  • the slideshow notes
  • finding a way for heping a student
  • lit circles
  • PAT time
  • kim kash
  • class money system
  • rewards/movies/field trips to hard workers
  • privileges from class
  • everything
  • giving detention for inappropriate behavior
  • notebooks
  • the notes we do in a notebook
  • the lit circles
  • popsicle sticks and auctions
  • power points
  • auctions
  • homework checkers
  • I would like to keep how strict the school is like the detentions, saturday, and Friday schools and uniform policy
  • should keep everything
  • keep the history notes book
  • keep the money and job system
  • doing your work
  • working hard
  • keep powerpoints
  • keep pictures
  • keep main points in history
  • doing SS
  • giving PAT time
  • being a teacher
  • creativity
  • determanity
  • being caring & funny
  • projecting notes onto the board
  • science experiments because they help us learn better
  • the way that you teach
  • the cheat sheets
  • trying to make lessons fun
  • projects
  • pushing your kid to their limit
  • seating arrangements
  • groups/jobs
  • jepardy/reading groups
  • powerpoint notes for social studies
  • game we played for each unit
  • civil war game

CHANGE:

  • give less hw
  • nothing
  • money
  • going to fast on the subjects
  • not giving examples to see
  • your way of punishing everyone because of one person
  • homework -> less strict on little things – > differnet punishments (30 min after school)
  • amount hw -> to maybe 3 big things
  • Jobs (4 class jobs) -> to more sufficient time
  • the money system
  • the way you teach
  • the kim kash money system
  • giving social studies unit tests
  • red and yellow folders
  • they way to take notes
  • discipline
  • lines for everyone to lines for those disturbing
  • the way of organizing groups
  • how you teach science – should be like history
  • the testing format
  • some ways to make learning fun
  • maybe you should change the way of taking notes, and the mini-projects
  • some rules
  • some ideas
  • frustration
  • tutoring hours
  • seating rules
  • rules in class
  • class arrangement
  • have more fun w/ class
  • the amount of homework given
  • the way you lose children in fieldtrips
  • the way you do project
  • don’t put too much detail on the project
  • sitting arrangement
  • writing
  • homework
  • some notes to pictures
  • half notes and some pictures
  • early risers

START

  • having everything planned out
  • making math fun by relating to real life problems
  • cheat sheets for ELA, SS, Science
  • letting students go to restroom
  • put kids on a table so they could help each others
  • help them how to write notes on ther own
  • giving out more freedom to the kids who actually do work
  • sticking to 1 thing: ex: keep the money system, no break outs
  • giving 3 big homeworks than 10
  • adding fun to class/teaching
  • having more educational games to have students get involved
  • introducing more projects to your class
  • giving out more pop quizzes and challenge the students
  • exit tickets
  • giving exit tickets
  • organizing binders
  • more activities. for example, yearbook, chess, soccer, or even tutoring
  • having cheat sheets on science
  • giving more group work
  • start giving students more time to do homework during class, and more ways to earn PAT points
  • doing something fun
  • make teaching fun
  • listening to the students
  • having more group work
  • doing more jeopardy games
  • more projects, less hw
  • giving less tests
  • using desk arrangements
  • having more pets
  • being more calm
  • teaching Social Studies in a more interesting way
  • to make some projects a little more fun
  • don’t make a lesson confusing
  • trying to know them
  • try to be a friend not a teacher
  • cheat sheets
  • games
  • homework passes
  • not read books at home, out of school

STOP

  • Losing students in field trips
  • Yelling
  • nothing
  • screaming
  • giving kids independence time because kids get stuck
  • testing new methods of teaching, because it usually just wastes time
  • maybe not full time detention but half depending on what they did
  • detention next day — instead, let some of them do it on that day
  • picking on any one person
  • making students write letters to them (i’m assuming this refers to Donorschoose)
  • selling items to other students
  • the Outside Reading Book reports
  • speeches
  • folders for homework
  • red and yellow folders
  • giving us so many lectures
  • the economy thing
  • on ELA, stop giving class book reading
  • stop giving so many projects and essays and figure out a way to instead of punishing the whole class, only the student who misbehaves
  • getting whole class in trouble
  • making it boring
  • being angry at the whole class
  • stop giving a lot of hw
  • giving hw
  • giving detentions
  • after school tutoring
  • leaving much hw
  • explain hw a little better
  • class economy
  • yelling
  • getting mad for little things
  • don’t get too excited for something
  • trying to keep all students in class
  • nothing
  • lit circles

Epilogue

Today was my last day of teaching my students.  The last day of school is already an emotional affair, especially for 8th graders who are now embarking on a journey into high school, but remember, I’ve been with my students the past two years and a majority of them have been with each other for the past three.

I am the kind of person that can easily dissect other people’s practice, but it’s hard to dissect mine.  On one hand, I had students do an informal evaluation form for me (Keep, Change, Stop, Start), and honestly, it was pretty sad.  I felt so sad because their suggestions were valid.  Yes, to a certain point, there were certain policies that I would change if I could – only that the school wouldn’t allow it – but other points were really on me.  (Many students felt that I should stop yelling and clarify homework more).  It’s sad.  How crappy must it be to be confused in class and have a teacher who blows her fuse regularly by the end of the day? I am hoping that this was due in part to the environment, and that a new environment could help me change.

On the other hand, I honestly had kids from other classes (and from mine) declaring that I was one of the greatest or their favorite or their favorite with a disclaimer (ie: Favorite teacher who brought lots of suffering; I think you’re now my favorite teacher, barely; You’re my second favorite teacher – after my 1st grade teacher).  So, I know I’m doing something right.  Yet is it just because they have nothing better to compare with?

I feel like this year, I got better about yelling.  Hopefully every year, this will get better.

did ask for forgiveness on the last day of school to my class, for my tongue, for my angry outbursts, and … oh darn it!  I forgot to tell them that I TRIED!  Man! I had this epic speech planned, but as usual, there were lots of random things to do, so the school day ended in a sweep.

 

Today we finished Glory and I don’t think the kids liked it.  In general, I’m realizing that maybe the reason why there are remakes of movies are because people don’t watch them in the same way that we do!  And their attention needs to be caught a different way. Whatever, I digress.

Then we had an epic raffle/auction, we had an awards ceremony, we had silly awards, I gave out books that I got for each one of them, and we cleaned the room.  Then right before my slideshow, this inspirational speaker came early.  Honestly, I liked the speaker a lot.  BUT… REALLY? ON THE LAST DAY OF SCHOOL?

We had 2 minutes left and kids stayed late to watch the slideshow.  But, as technology would have it, it was pretty laggy.  Different kids left bit by bit and I made sure to give each of them a hug.  Then, one of my enigmas (a large, stoic, semi-stern boy) came to say goodbye and I saw that his face was awash in tears, and I had to cry too.  Then another of my girls (she is the only one being retained this year because she stopped doing work after 1st quarter, pretty much), began to cry when I told her she could contact me for anything, and I just cried too because I wish I could’ve been there more for her.

It was truly bittersweet, and nothing kicked in until I saw four boys a block away, walking away, and I realized, they are walking away for good.

In the car I cried, because I was just awash with regret.  I wish I could have done more because I could have. I could have been more patient, taken care of myself better, been more on top of things so as not to snap when I’m disorganized, and I could have really tried and not allowed my kids to step down . I think especially of the aforementioned boy and girl.  This year, I sent the boy to a 7th grade math class because he had been low last year and this year he was low, didn’t turn in work, and agreed that going down would be best.  The girl was retained and I was just sick of how slow she worked (when she’s actually very smart.. just every week, she’d get slower and slower).  Yet, I could have been there more.

I think I prioritized the kids who were behavioral and academic issues, so I would always try to talk to them and figure them out and work with them, and because the boy and girl were relatively well-behaved, I did not step out and be with them and guide them and lead them as much as I could have.  And I just cried because I could have done more.

And no, this is not your cue to say, “Aww, you’re such a great teacher, you did your best.”  I understand I did my best, and I understand that I am above average.  Just, it’s, in this neighborhood, they need more, and at the end of the day, I wasn’t selfless, I wasn’t an aroma of Christ.  I know that there were many occasions where my selfishness oozed from my actions yet it was coated by the artificial mask of teach-y charity.

I honestly do feel a lot of loss right now.  In a sense, I think I feel a tiny fraction of what parents go through when they send their child to college- except this is with 24 of them.

 

Rage and Response

The time in the blog where I rage my feelings and then respond rationally.

Fuzz is so rude to me.  He talks backs, mutters under his breath, and acts all incredulous when I say things such as, “Stop talking” or “excuse you.”  I hate how he holds up his hands in mock innocence and how he gives me his smile as he says, “Oh Ms. Kim, you don’t know how terrible I could really be.”  I hate how he assumes my letting him off the hook is a sign of weakness or how when I sternly reprimand him, he thinks I’m overreacting. I hate his condescending attitude and his know-it-all commentary.  Yet then I feel bad because I’m the teacher, and I’m supposed to be the one that goes the extra mile, swallows his sarcasm, and gives him second, third, and fourth chances.  But, really.  Why do I have to be the person who’s polite, kind, and doesn’t give low blows?  Why?  

Okay. Really?  You are the teacher.  You are the one there who is supposed to care.  You are loved. So you can love.  YES. Who cares if he thinks you’re stupid or easy?  Who cares if he thinks you’re strict and overly demanding?  Either way, you need to love.  And remember, there’s a fine line between revoking privileges and punitively lashing back from a position of power.  Be gracious.

Okay, fine.  I hear what you’re saying but it’s still not really registering.  Moving on. In general, I’m just really disappointed.  I feel like at the end of the year, there’s been no impact.  I read a study recently talking about how in middle school, students respond better from watching than from being preached at, but it feels like none of that works.  These kids are still super whiney and grumpy when it comes to things like my forbidding soda!  I told them today not to purchase soda, and then I left.  Then they snuck soda anyway.  Then today, I’m grading poems and one poem is totally plagiarized.  It’s just.  What do I do? It’s the end of the year.  If they haven’t learned it by now, then when will they learn it?  Do I even bring it up?  I bet they’re tired of hearing it. I’m tired of saying it.

They will look back and remember.  You never know.  And girl, you’re fighting against a system.  The large sugar companies target youths and it’s not your fault if health is not reinforced at home.  At the same time, do you think you’re just pushing your yuppie ideals onto your kids?  Soda and attitude aside, they’re 8th graders.  They’re learning how to function in society, and at least, you stuck by your guns even though it made you unpopular. Good for you.

In terms of plagiarism, yes you need to talk to that student.  I’m not sure what you should “do” though.  You’ve talked with him before about his “minimal is best” mentality, and you know that his parents actually don’t see school as that important. I know it’s killing you that this super bright child is literally wasting his brains, but at the end of the day, are you his parent?  Do what you’re supposed to do – and no more.  Don’t try to add consequences or get him to feel it.  You have plenty more of these kids in the future, and there’s no point in working yourself up about this.  This has happened before with this kid.  You’ve had him for two years.  You have 6 more days with him.  No miracles will happen.  Sorry.

Okay. Um rage and response is not working.  All it’s doing is making me feel more worked up.  At the end of the day, I just wonder.. am I too hard on them?  I know a lot of times plagiarism happens because students feel helpless.  Am I just setting them up for failure?  Yet how do I gauge scaffolding versus student responsibility?  

At the end of the day, be honest.  With the research projects, did you give them enough time?  Were you available?  With the poetry project, were you there, and were you walking through it with them?  I know there’s always more you can do.  I know that if they were listening the first time, you wouldn’t have to explain it again.  And yet, isn’t it also your responsibility to keep them engaged?  Don’t worry- next year, you can have time to figure out how to connect what you’re teaching to who they are as people.  You can continue to edit and fix.  You like that.  You can do it.

It’s the end of the year, and this year, it was sad.  Every time I went on break, I wasn’t refreshed when I came back to school, I was irritated. I didn’t want to be here.  I hope next year will be better, because at the end of the day, if this is how I feel inside, well, I need feedback from others, but maybe I need to move on.

You know what? Maybe you do.  Or maybe, you at your worst is still better than some at their best.  Let’s keep working at it, and let’s not be depressed.  It’s almost 11pm and you’re tired.  Take a nap and prepare some more.  We’ll try this once more.  Just remember: tomorrow: be cheerful.  So what if they didn’t do their homework? It’s not the end of the world.  What are your objectives?  Let’s stick to that.

Fine.

 

They will disappoint you.

But love them anyway.

Love them anyway?

Why?

I’m so sick of it.

The noncommittal shrugs.

The mumbled, “I don’t know’s” 

The smirks.

The avoided eye contact.

Okay fine.

suppose it’s because they’re having a hard time.

With school.

With home.

With summer break just around the corner.

But why–just because I have this title–am I expected to be so selfless and ever-patient?

Why, Mr. Middle-Class Taxpayer, do you get to criticize me when I lose my temper and confess?

Why do I have to deal with condescending nods, outbursts of anger, ill-concealed whispers, attitude up the whazoo.

Why do I have to love them?

What have they done to earn any of it?

.

.

.

.

.

.

And this is probably why I have such difficulties working in an environment where “everything is earned.”  

Partly because for those who have not “earned” much, grow so disheartened that by the end of the year, they’ve given up.

Partly because I refuse to be someone that dangles bait — it cheapens the motivation.

Yet mostly because everything is not earned.  

This time, I’m not talking about the social construct (although that could apply too).

I love because He first loved me.

And the Gospel is where I’m laid bare and broken.

Because this is just super hard.  

It’s really hard to love.

Pushing Back Against the “School Saves” Narrative

An unpublished post from 2/20/14 (two months ago).  Still applies.

We’ve seen this everywhere: stories, op-eds, movies.  The teacher or the school flies into the neighborhood or town.  Takes out their Mary Poppins carpetbag of tricks and voila, students change!

I watch clips like these, and I’m not gonna lie – it gets me every time. I cry, I weep, I feel guilt, I feel relief.

Yet at the same time, I feel scorn, and I know the satire and the naivete. And it reeks.

I see someone of privilege come in and say the exact words I say to my kids:

The positive, “I know this is not you – I know you can do better, you are better.”

The strict, “You gotta give respect to earn respect!”

The risque, “After you die, you rot in the ground, and everyone else will go on living!” ..  That sort of response is supposed to achieve a hush-hush effect, the whole “did she really say that?” thing.  The words that adults disapprove of yet also admire and defend showing how this teacher is “level” to the kids.  This teacher was just spouting “real talk.”

Honestly, it sucks.  How does a teacher from a middle class background actually know anything about their students?  How can they realistically speak “hard” “street” words when they drive a car and have insurance and a savings account?  Half of these teachers are in their first jobs out of college and they weren’t going to make it as I-bankers or get into law school right away, so they’re here to make themselves for competitive.

I’m not saying baby the kids.  They don’t need that.  But… there has to be something more.

I know Lisa Delpit and David Whitman could probably give a more nuanced explanation/critique. But my poor poor mind is so frizzled that at this point, only the emotions that I felt from grad school remain.  The actual research and analyses?  Buried somewhere in the recesses of my brain (or so I would like to think).

Pray and Love.

Cadet: Ms. Kim, did you hear about the boy that drowned on Wednesday?

Me: What? no!

Cadet: That was my cousin.

Me: What?  What?

Cadet: Yeah.

Me: How’s he related.. like, is he on your mom’s side?…

======================================================

Boy swept out to sea

The U.S. Coast Guard suspended its search Thursday for a 14-year-old boy who was swept out to sea at San Francisco’s Ocean Beach on Wednesday afternoon.

The boy, identified as Marco Cornejo, was swimming with his father and cousin at the beach near Lincoln Way when the group became distressed just before 4 p.m.

A 17-year-old surfer, Tony Barbero, a junior at San Francisco’s St. Ignatius College Preparatory high school, rescued Marco’s father and cousin.

The father was taken to a hospital in critical condition while the cousin was not severely injured.

Fire and U.S. Coast Guard crews have been searching for the 14-year-old since Wednesday afternoon using helicopters and boats.

U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Loumania Stewart said after scouring 64 nautical square miles spanning from the Golden Gate to the southern end of Ocean Beach, the search has been suspended as of around 1:40 p.m. Thursday.

Stewart said crews will restart the search if the agency receives any more information.

- ABC Bay Area News Roundup

======================================================

 Today was so tumultuous. The day before Spring break, the kids were having a hard time handling themselves. I had training so I had to leave early.  I didn’t get time to properly talk with Cadet.  On my way home, I went back to school to call his home to express my condolences.  Then midway through the rings, I realized my Spanish sucks.  And when I spoke with his mother, her voice was breaking, my heart was breaking, and I’m not sure if the communication was broken too.  I’m not sure if I overstepped my boundaries.  I’m not sure if she knew that I cared or cared that I called.  I wonder if I should have just left it.  But I wanted Cadet to know that even if I’m just briefly interacting with each student, that I care for him as a person, and that person includes the family as well.  BUT, what if that was just selfish of me, to look like a “caring teacher” when I should have left the family alone to grieve?

I wish I knew what to do.  Since I don’t, I pray.  Through that, perhaps I can better love.

You had one job.

Ever since my “you have one job” spiel to my kids, they’ve been pulling it out anytime I make a tiny mistake.

Today we had a lockdown drill, and to confess, I get very jumpy just thinking about what would happen during a fire, an earthquake, and God forbid, a lockdown.  In my first school, I accidentally had my kids get under their desks during a fire drill.  What a fail.  (“That’s what drills are for!”)

Anyway, on my part, I need to lock my doors and turn off the lights.  My hands shook and I swear, I checked the door twice, and muttered under my breath, “We need to figure out a way to lock the doors from inside.”  Then, as we waited quietly, the door suddenly jerks open, and I said, “What the–!” as I locked eyes with my principal.  My automatic assumption was that she had unlocked it to announce that the drill was over, but no!  THE DOOR WAS UNLOCKED!  

Student responses:

Renman: Great, Ms. Kim, we all died just now.

Shrek: You had one job.

Ouch.  But so true.  :( 

And I had felt so noble standing near the door instead of going to hide behind my desk, like I would have wanted to do if there WAS a crazy person walking around our school.

Another crazy thing happened today:  I split up a potential fight.  The weirdest feeling for me though was when I had my hand on the larger boy’s arm and he just jerked his arm out got up and started going towards the younger boy.  But, I was just so angry too.  For me, the biggest form of cowardice/bullying is talking down to or threatening someone who’s younger than you.  It’s just sucky.  Thank the Lord that a teacher walked by and then the principal came.  I forgot this had happened until right now. 

Mainly though, what frustrated me the most is how gossipy my kids get about this.  I wish they would just take the higher road instead of the he-said, she-said thing.  

OH YEAH. Another thing: one kid who was in my room during lunch detention, stuck my girl’s eraser down his pants. That’s just nasty.  And it again riled me up.  Not because of what he did but how excited and voyeuristic my students get about this.  Sure, sure, kids will be kids.  But I think this is why nothing real gets done (from a societal perspective).  Kids and adults, we’re the same.  We get caught up in the juicy tidbits and latest gossip and lose sight of what really matters, so that in the end, the ones who take a stand are the only ones left standing.